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Market of Senlis in Senlis, France (Marché de Senlis)

I’m now working on a documentation project on traditional markets in Africa, Asia and Europe in partnership with GoUNESCO, a UNESCO New Delhi initiative to “help promote awareness of and provide tools for laypersons to engage with heritage.” For the next 12 months I’ll be featuring markets in these regions, with a brief guide on the “must-knows” when visiting. The nitty-gritty socio-cultural details will be featured on a future publication. Join me as we tour around bazaars of the world! 🙂

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The Senlis street market within the medieval walls

Name of market: Marché de Senlis/ Market of Senlis

Address: Downtown of Senlis, L’Oise, Hauts-de-France, France.

Operating days and times: Tuesday and Friday, 8:00 AM – 12 NN

How to get there: via train from Paris Gare du Nord or Paris Gare de Lyon. The trip takes around 1.5 hours. If via car from Paris Gare du Nord, it takes around 45 minutes.

Website: www.en.senlis-tourisme.fr

Fast Facts:

  • Senlis is a medieval town built in the 12th century and stands as a testament to changes in the socio-economic and political climate of France. It is said that nothing much has changed since it was left in ruins right after the end of the French Revolution in 1799.
  • Aside from the local street market, other town attractions include the Cathedral of Notre Dame, Senlis castle, and the now-abandoned (thankfully) Roman ampitheatre which staged gladiator fights.

Visitor Tips: 

  • Arrive early especially if you’re looking to shop for fresh produce and homemade cooked foods. They sell out pretty fast.
  • It can help if you know how to speak a bit of French. Since this is a local market with trades dominated by the older generation, many stall owners will appreciate it if you at least know how to ask for prices and to count in French.

Get lost and find yourself. Happy travels! 🙂

P.S. The keys to sustainable travels are universal: take public transportation | stay in accommodations where cooking is allowed (private or shared, it doesn’t matter) | walk as much as you can | wake up early | stay away from guidebooks | immerse yourself in local language, culture and history | visit local cafés | know that the possibilities are endless | listen to your gut❤

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Market Find 3: Barbecue Skewers

Largely a meat-loving society, it is common for Filipinos to have meat viands and snacks paired up with steamed rice and sawsawan (dips).

Visitors to the Philippines may find it surprising to see barbecue skewers being sold in markets both in large and small markets. The fare is sold so casually that even kids are asked to fan out the skewers as they are being roasted with locally sourced charcoal and a makeshift rack.

At around PHP 10 (0.2 USD) per stick, it is not bad when you’re craving for a rich protein fix. As for health concerns, I think this issue has more to do with how soon and how much you want to adapt. We all can’t go on eating off a pack, don’t we?

Barbecue skewers at PHP 10 per stick!

Get lost and find yourself. Happy travels! 🙂

P.S. The keys to sustainable travels are universal: take public transportation | stay in accommodations where cooking is allowed (private or shared, it doesn’t matter) | walk as much as you can | wake up early | stay away from guidebooks | immerse yourself in local language, culture and history | visit local cafés | know that the possibilities are endless | listen to your gut ❤

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Market Find 2: Churros

A main fare in Spain and in its former and current colonies, churros, also called tejeringos, calientes, calentitos de rueda, or calentitos de papas, has gained worldwide popularity thanks to its addicting texture and taste.

It is not uncommon to see churros in markets in Spain, Latin America, and in the Philippines. However, remember that churros has been indigenized depending on where it’s made. For example, in the Philippines, churros has inspired the creation of deep fried “donat” (a borrowing from the term “doughnut”).

Try churros plain, with dulce de leche, chocolate, or cinnamon as popularized by Disney Theme Parks.

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Churros with dulce de leche filling (Seville, Spain).

Get lost and find yourself. Happy travels! 🙂

P.S. The keys to sustainable travels are universal: take public transportation | stay in accommodations where cooking is allowed (private or shared, it doesn’t matter) | walk as much as you can | wake up early | stay away from guidebooks | immerse yourself in local language, culture and history | visit local cafés | know that the possibilities are endless | listen to your gut ❤

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Market Find 1: Ar-arosep/ Seaweed/ Sea Grape/ Green Caviar

The Philippines has one of the most diverse ecosystems in the world and its marine life is no exception.

One interesting find in Philippine markets in the Ilocos region is “Ar-arosep,” a local term for seaweed, sea grape, and green caviar.

Only seasonally available in high-end restaurants overseas, the Philippines is lucky yet again to be gifted with Ar-arosep that is best known to treat thyroid disorders. That is an advice taken from local elders who have precious wisdom passed down from generations.

Water pollution is the major threat to the increasing fall of Ar-arosep.

If you pass by Ilokano markets, be sure to look for this navy green, bush-like presence. It’s best enjoyed fresh with sliced Ilokano tomatoes (tiny but very sweet).

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Ar-arosep: one of the many overlooked Philippine market finds

Get lost and find yourself. Happy travels! 🙂

P.S. The keys to sustainable travels are universal: take public transportation | stay in accommodations where cooking is allowed (private or shared, it doesn’t matter) | walk as much as you can | wake up early | stay away from guidebooks | immerse yourself in local language, culture and history | visit local cafés | know that the possibilities are endless | listen to your gut ❤

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Nagwon/Nakwon Music Arcade in Seoul, South Korea (낙원 악기상가)

I’m now working on a documentation project on traditional markets in Africa, Asia and Europe in partnership with GoUNESCO, a UNESCO New Delhi initiative to “help promote awareness of and provide tools for laypersons to engage with heritage.” For the next 12 months I’ll be featuring markets in these regions, with a brief guide on the “must-knows” when visiting. The nitty-gritty socio-cultural details will be featured on a future publication. Join me as we tour around bazaars of the world! 🙂

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The Nagwon Music Arcade. Since all signs are written in Korean, look for the Standard Chartered Bank across the subway. The arcade starts on the second floor of this building.

Name of market: Nagwon/Nakwon Music Arcade (낙원 악기상가)

Address: 110-707 428, Samil-daero, Jongno-gu, Seoul

Operating times: Monday – Saturday (closed on Sundays), 9 AM – 8 PM

How to get there: via subway, Jongno-3-ga Station (Line 1, 3, 5, Exit 5, to your right). It starts on the second floor of Standard Chartered Bank.

Fast Facts:

  • This is the ultimate go-to for music enthusiasts in South Korea. The arcade has everything: from Spanish guitars, baby pianos, to pink guitars customizable with your own name.
  • As the arcade is mostly catered for Koreans, the signages are written in Korean as well. Just ask around where “Nagwon Music Arcade” is and locals will be more than helpful to assist you. Tip: It’s on the second floor of “Standard Chartered Bank” just across Exit 5 of Jongno 3 (sam)-ga station.
  • Shop owners here know their stuff well as they are serious musicians themselves. You will be safe from vague selling points typical with general music stores.

Visitor Tips:

  • It would be useful to learn basic Hangeul (Korean script) and Korean when visiting this market because almost all signs are written in Hangeul. You can check out Talk to Me in Korean, hands down the best resource for Korean language learning!
  • South Korea now has an information hotline for tourists, operating 24/7. You can call the office at 1330 (when calling within Korea), or +82 1330 (when calling from outside Korea). Four languages are currently supported: English, Chinese, Japanese and Korean.

Get lost and find yourself. Happy travels! 🙂

P.S. The keys to sustainable travels are universal: take public transportation | stay in accommodations where cooking is allowed (private or shared, it doesn’t matter) | walk as much as you can | wake up early | stay away from guidebooks | immerse yourself in local language, culture and history | visit local cafés | know that the possibilities are endless | listen to your gut ❤

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Tongin Market in Seoul, South Korea (통인 시장)

I’m now working on a documentation project on traditional markets in Africa, Asia and Europe in partnership with GoUNESCO, a UNESCO New Delhi initiative to “help promote awareness of and provide tools for laypersons to engage with heritage.” For the next 12 months I’ll be featuring markets in these regions, with a brief guide on the “must-knows” when visiting. The nitty-gritty socio-cultural details will be featured on a future publication. Join me as we tour around bazaars of the world! 🙂

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Tongin Market, just a few minutes away from Gyeongbokgung Palace.

Name of market: Tongin Market (통인 시장)

Address: 18, Jahamun-ro 15-gil, Jongno-gu, Seoul

Operating days and times: All 7 days of the week, 8:30 AM – 6 PM. Except for: the third Sunday of each month (for stalls), and Mondays (Dosirak Café).

How to get there: via subway, Gyeongbokgung Station (Line 3, Exit 2). A few blocks after Geumcheongyo Market.

Market map: Download here. Provided for free by South Korea’s Tourism Office.

Fast Facts:

  • The market is famous for its dosirak (bento-like) packed lunches, where you get to curate your own meal set. This is a unique concept, far off from the pre-prepared dosirak lunches usually bought in stores.
  • Tongin Market is not only a go-to for fresh produce. It is also a popular meeting place for the elderly, where a big pagoda stands outside the main entrance where 할머니 (halmeoni, “grandmother”) and 할아버지 (harabeoji, “grandfather”) gather to play chess, eat snacks, and catch up.
  • The market has a very local feel, situated quite far from popular tourist areas and the subway.

Visitor Tips:

  • It would be useful to learn basic Hangeul (Korean script) and Korean when visiting this market because almost all signs are written in Hangeul. You can check out Talk to Me in Korean, hands down the best resource for Korean language learning!
  • South Korea now has an information hotline for tourists, operating 24/7. You can call the office at 1330 (when calling within Korea), or +82 1330 (when calling from outside Korea). Four languages are currently supported: English, Chinese, Japanese and Korean.

Get lost and find yourself. Happy travels! 🙂

P.S. The keys to sustainable travels are universal: take public transportation | stay in accommodations where cooking is allowed (private or shared, it doesn’t matter) | walk as much as you can | wake up early | stay away from guidebooks | immerse yourself in local language, culture and history | visit local cafés | know that the possibilities are endless | listen to your gut ❤

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Geumcheongyo Market in Seoul, South Korea (금천교 시장)

I’m now working on a documentation project on traditional markets in Africa, Asia and Europe in partnership with GoUNESCO, a UNESCO New Delhi initiative to “help promote awareness of and provide tools for laypersons to engage with heritage.” For the next 12 months I’ll be featuring markets in these regions, with a brief guide on the “must-knows” when visiting. The nitty-gritty socio-cultural details will be featured on a future publication. Join me as we tour around bazaars of the world! 🙂

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Geumcheongyo Market, famous for its samgyetang (chicken soup)

Name of market: Geumcheongyo Market (금천교 시장)

Address: Google Map

Operating days and times: All 7 days of the week. 8:30 AM – 6 PM

How to get there: via subway, Gyeongbokgung Station, Exit 2, first left.

Fast Facts:

  • Near the famous Gwanghwamun area, Geumcheongyo Market is a must-see for Korean traditional and street food enthusiasts. It’s important to note that although it’s locally called “Geumcheongyo Market,” the entrance arc in fact says, “Sejong Maeul Imsig Munhwa Goli (세종마을 음식문화 거리).” Don’t get lost!
  • There are so many local shops to choose from but the area is famous for its samgyetang (chicken soup), a highly sought-after Korean dish made with ginseng and many other spices. It can be more expensive than other Korean soup dishes, but it offers many health benefits that it’s usually put on menus as a food for gongang (건강)/ good health.
  • The market gives a small community feel, which caters largely to locals.

Visitor Tips:

  • It would be useful to learn basic Hangeul (Korean script) and Korean when visiting this market because almost all signs are written in Hangeul. You can check out Talk to Me in Korean, hands down the best resource for Korean language learning!
  • South Korea now has an information hotline for tourists, operating 24/7. You can call the office at 1330 (when calling within Korea), or +82 1330 (when calling from outside Korea). Four languages are currently supported: English, Chinese, Japanese and Korean.

Get lost and find yourself. Happy travels! 🙂

P.S. The keys to sustainable travels are universal: take public transportation | stay in accommodations where cooking is allowed (private or shared, it doesn’t matter) | walk as much as you can | wake up early | stay away from guidebooks | immerse yourself in local language, culture and history | visit local cafés | know that the possibilities are endless | listen to your gut ❤