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Why I Left My Online English Teaching Gig

I got accepted at Rarejob in November 2014, at a time where I realized I needed to spread out my risks in the midst of the recession. I had friends and relatives who got laid off from their jobs around this time, and so I wanted to have a “back up” in case I lose my job, too.

English teaching-min

Teaching English while cross-legged on the bed

I’ve enjoyed the flexibility of this online English teaching gig. I could punch in the hours depending on my availability, and I can have enough time to review lesson materials before the class. I had the chance to meet a range of students across different backgrounds, from teenagers who want to study abroad, to the elderly who enjoy working as volunteer tour guides, to professionals who are working in international environments. I am thankful for the opportunity to meet these people, albeit virtually.

Low pay, but…

The pay was low (during my time, it was at $2.50 per hour), but since it is an additional source of income, I find no reason to complain. I am not obligated in any way to follow a certain schedule, or to report to a supervisor at the end of every day. So, on weekends, instead of oversleeping or watching TV, I would log in to the Rarejob portal and teach through Skype. It was a nice way to spend some hours of my weekend, and I learn something about Japanese culture along the way, too.

Why I left

I left this online English teaching gig not because of the pay, but because of lack of trust within me. I am not a native English teacher, and I am not even close to being someone who can translate Filipino documents to English, so why am I here, teaching English?

I realized this when I was looking for a French teacher online. I found it funny to find non-French, Canadian, and African teachers who were offering their services, too. I even saw a Filipino who marketed herself as a Filipino, English, and French teacher, when her English wasn’t even that good (mine is not good, too, but hers had serious grammatical errors).

I thought, I will never want to be taught my target language by a non-native speaker. Although many non-native speakers can speak, write, and understand the language on an advanced level, I still find inconsistencies with how non-natives understand their second language. Just like me, I still have to check for my prepositions every so often, and I’m not that confident just yet in speaking English.

So, why would I bother getting a non-native teacher when I can get one who grew up using the language?

Reality in the age of political correctness

In this day, my stance may be deemed racist.

Everyone should have equal opportunities! If others can do it, we, in developing countries, can do it, too! Why should our race dictate what we can do?

And the discussion goes on and on and on.

But I’m just being real here. Why would I choose a non-native speaker for a language teacher, when I can get a native teacher even if I have to pay a bit more? And can I really trust the knowledge of someone who only knew how to use the language for the last two decades? Of course, I want to put where my money has its worth, so I will not think twice about learning French with someone who grew up speaking, writing, listening to, and understanding the language.

This one, though, is absurd: Students don’t trust lecturers who aren’t native speakers. I can only speak for language classes, and not for anything else.

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