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Havelis in Jaipur, India

This article is part of a regional reporting project in partnership with GoUNESCO, a UNESCO New Delhi initiative.

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Havelis: a constant sight in Jaipur

An interesting constant feature in bazaars around Jaipur, India, is the haveli.

Havelis of Jaipur refer to “medieval north Indian mansions belonging to nobles” (UNESCO, 2011) that feature square or rectangular-shaped courtyard houses. These structures are hard to miss for they form the very fabric of bazaar life in Jaipur.

Without the unique typology of havelis consisting of bungalows, stepped terraces, multiple courtyards, well-defined chowkri (sector), and intricate window panes, Jaipur’s noble past can be easily overridden by urbanization. Putting historical socio-economic issues aside, on architectural and cultural preservation points of view, we can give Rajasthan’s* Tourism and Urban Development Ministry due credit for all the preservation work being done.

Many havelis are passed down through generations and to sell these heirlooms are considered unthinkable. Today, many havelis are transformed into commercial rental spaces, restaurants, and guesthouses. Usually, the first floor is for rentals; and the subsequent floors serve as a guesthouse which is also managed by the haveli-owning family. The owning family lives in the haveli, as well.

It is best to think of a haveli structure as divided into two: the single-family cluster (1) and the servant cluster (2). Between these two clusters lies a thin zenana wing, a waiting area reserved for the house’s attending ladies (today, these cluster differentiations are redefined as you will read below). A family’s status is determined by the number of clusters in their haveli: more clusters mean a higher status.

  • Why it’s a good choice to stay in a haveli:  R and I are grateful for the opportunity to live in a haveli all throughout our stay here in Jaipur. Living in one is like stepping back in time with marble floorings, pillars, carvings, antique implements, and paintings found even in the tiniest of rooms.

A haveli guesthouse is run much like how it was in Jaipur’s noble past, with the owning family in its own cluster, the guests in another, and the attending men and women in another. These days, thankfully, things have changed: the clustering now only refers to sleeping arrangements, and it is not uncommon to see the owning family, guests, and attendants sharing a meal and working together.

Staying in a haveli is one of the rare opportunities to live in a breathing museum. It is okay to get too comfortable, too!

  • As with any country in the world: do not quickly assume. Make sense of the why behind the what first and while you’re at it, get lost and find yourself. Happy travels! 🙂

P.S. The keys to sustainable travels are universal: take public transportation | stay in accommodations where cooking is allowed (private or shared, it doesn’t matter) | walk as much as you can | wake up early | stay away from guidebooks | immerse yourself in local language, culture and history | visit local cafés | know that the possibilities are endless | listen to your gut❤

*Rajasthan refers to the northern state of India.

Source: Jain, S. (2011). Walking into the Microcosm of Jaipur. UNESCO New Delhi.

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They Who Paint Our Roof White: The Price of Cheap Labor

Looking back on this journal entry as a reminder to give thanks to our everyday heroes 🙂

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Yesterday upon waking up, I headed straight to our garage to jog on the treadmill a bit. Not so much of a routine; just something I thought of doing since I haven’t done it for a while. The unbearable heat tempted me in every way to go inside our room again and enjoy the air conditioner, but somebody suddenly caught my attention.
Race
I looked around: only Chippy, the family dog, was beside me.
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I looked around the second time, then a drop of white paint fell innocently on my right arm—I looked up.
Uy, Mang Temmy, andyan ka pala!
I seemed surprised but really, I was more afraid of the unaccountable calls earlier on.
Ang hirap dito sa taas, ang init! Pero mas matangkad na ‘ko sa ‘yo!
I just smiled, then laughed, not knowing what to say. As much…

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Birthday Treat from Healthy Options

Healthy Options, the “first and largest all-natural products store in the Philippines,” is giving away a PHP 50 rebate for every PHP 1,000 single-receipt purchase on any of its in-store products.

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To redeem: Quote my name “Raizel Albano” when making your purchase.

Also, download the Healthy Options app to gain access to exclusive deals:

Thank you, Healthy Options, for the birthday treat! 🙂

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Birthday Treat from Italki

Italki, one of the best sites to learn and brush up on your language skills online, is now giving away 50 ITC (Italki points) for every student referral.

Here is the promo code: ItalkiAnthro

Promo is only valid for today, August 1st.

*Nice to know: How to say “Happy birthday” in Korean?

생일 축하해 (Saeng-il chu-ka-hae) – In friendly language (to friend or younger person)

생일 축하드려요 (Saeng-il chu-ka-d-ryeo-yo) – In polite language (to older person)

Thank you, Italki, for the birthday treat!

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Salomon Xtrail Run 2017 Review

After five years since my last race… Finally! And now, with a new addition to my weekend run trips from this day forth:

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On our first trail run together

R and I haven’t been to Subic for x years now, and signing up for this race has not only been a good motivation for us to pick up running again but also as a willing excuse to take a weekend trip to celebrate our anniversary!

For the event details:

Name of event: Salomon Xtrail Run 2017

Date: July 23, 2017

Main organizers: Salomon and eXtribe

Venue: El Kabayo Stables (start and finish line), Subic Bay, Olongapo City

Trail run categories: 32K, 24K, 12K, and 6K

Average elevation: 48.33%- 46.67% (downhill- uphill ratio)

Run route (6K): from El Kabayo Stables, you run along the concrete path towards Mt. Maritan, then back towards the stables.

Registration fee: PHP 950 per person (additional 5% if paying via PayPal) inclusive of technical jersey, post-race meal, and giveaways

Impressions:

  • The race was well-organized with strategically stationed race marshalls along the route.
  • Unlimited refills of sports drinks before and after the race, and water during the race, provided that you bring your own water container. I personally prefer bringing my water bottle even during races as I can afford to do so because I do not run competitively 😛 Plus, I feel bad about wasting heaps of water.
  • Lots of goodies for worn-out runners after the race, something that is quite uncommon in the Philippine scene.
  • The only thing that could be better next time would be their race kit pick-up arrangement. All participants were required to pick up their race kits at extremely slim date windows (July 14-15 for registrants before July 10, and July 20-21 for registrants after July 10), and only at Salomon stores in Manila which happen to be in SM Aura, SM North Edsa, SM Megamall, and Glorietta 3. The inconvenience of picking the race kits for participants coming from areas in and around Subic might have contributed to the lack of local support. It felt like an event catered for those from Manila.
  • Why I’m joining again: Despite the race kit hassle, I will definitely join again because I felt so safe despite the event being a trail race! I actually felt so much safer here than in other road races, thanks to the many professional and supportive marshalls present all through the race. The event being in Subic, it is also a destination in itself. Check out Subic Bay’s official tourism website for local travel advice.
  • And at par with my usual travel advice: do not quickly assume. Make sense of the why behind the what first and while you’re at it, get lost and find yourself. Happy travels! 🙂

P.S. The keys to sustainable travels are universal: take public transportation | stay in accommodations where cooking is allowed (private or shared, it doesn’t matter) | walk as much as you can | wake up early | stay away from guidebooks | immerse yourself in local language, culture and history | visit local cafés | know that the possibilities are endless | listen to your gut ❤